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FrequencyScale = Frequency Shifter?

0 votes
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Dearest Modulators,

I am trying to recreate the 808 snare drum in Kyma, and I am experiencing a knowledge gap. This version requires a Triangle wave at 111 hz fed into two 'Frequency Shifters' both set to static specific frequencies.

Kyma's 'FrequencyScale' seemed like the most sensible place to start. Reading the description, it mentions using a constant to set a specific value, (done), but my issue starts with knowing what to do with the FrequencyScale paramter. If I set it to 0, I get clicks, and 1 seems apparently unchanged, and 2 unchanged still.

No idea what I am supposed to be doing lol .

EDIT:

Ok, I went back and re-read the article I was working from, apparently, paying attention to the words as well as the pictures helps.

From Article

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You may remember that the partials generated by the shell and air modes of the snare drum fell into two camps: two shifted harmonic series, plus a pair of enharmonic partials generated by the 0,1 mode. I devised two signal paths to recreate these: a triangle oscillator and two frequency-shifters to generate the shifted series, and two sine-wave oscillators to generate the 0,1 frequencies. You may also remember that I admitted that the frequency-shifters in the upper path were an expensive solution to the problem of recreating the snare sound. Well, Roland's engineers found a cost-effective solution when they designed the TR909: they ignored the shifted series, and just employed two oscillators and two waveshapers to generate the 0,1 frequenciesYou may remember that the partials generated by the shell and air modes of the snare drum fell into two camps: two shifted harmonic series, plus a pair of enharmonic partials generated by the 0,1 mode. I devised two signal paths to recreate these: a triangle oscillator and two frequency-shifters to generate the shifted series, and two sine-wave oscillators to generate the 0,1 frequencies. You may also remember that I admitted that the frequency-shifters in the upper path were an expensive solution to the problem of recreating the snare sound. Well, Roland's engineers found a cost-effective solution when they designed the TR909: they ignored the shifted series, and just employed two oscillators and two waveshapers to generate the 0,1 frequencies

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Ok, am adjusting and experimenting....

Any pointers?

Ta Charlie

asked May 25, 2018 in Using Kyma by charlienorton (Adept) (2,510 points)
edited May 25, 2018 by charlienorton
I'm now wondering if I have over complicated this, and should just use two oscillators to generate the frequencies?

2 Answers

+1 vote

Hi Charlie,

I hope this is a start.

Best regards,

Roland

http://kyma.symbolicsound.com/qa/?qa=blob&qa_blobid=12719610433711155413

answered May 25, 2018 by roland-kuit (Adept) (2,030 points)
edited May 26, 2018 by roland-kuit
That is a fantastic start, both sounds have got me thinking about fresh trajectories! I do like the quad oscillator version, I would not have previously considered this approach!
Thanks so much, I do hope you are well.
C.

I'm very well thanks Charlie!

Here some add-ons :)

http://kyma.symbolicsound.com/qa/?qa=blob&qa_blobid=1698861113319633708

+2 votes
So as Roland is demonstrating, frequency-shifting is shifting all harmonics by the same offset (which is different from frequency-scaling which is multiplying all harmonic frequencies by the same scalar). The traditional way to do frequency-shifting is with single side band ring modulation.

Search (ctrl+B) for the Prototypes for SingleSideBandRM. (There is also a QuadOscillator in the Prototypes).
answered May 26, 2018 by ssc (Savant) (90,660 points)
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